Month: October 2017

Book Review – Reaching Your Next Summit!: 9 Vertical Lessons for Leading with Impact

Manley Feinberg’s book, Reaching Your Next Summit!, teaches valuable lessons on leadership and change. I work in the information technology field, and I have found the book to be very helpful. In IT, the work is very often about introducing positive changes and facing adverse changes through effective leadership. Feinberg’s experiences are both well-articulated and inspiring.

Whether you are reading this book for managing work or for personal reasons, applying the change management and resilient leadership lessons in the book can have a profound impact. I was delighted to have come across this excellent book.

什麼會拉響你的警笛

(從我的一個喜歡與尊敬的作家,賽斯 高汀

在某個地方,有人在做某些會引起你注意的事情,煽動你去採取行動。

在某個地方有某個人正在:

拿你的份額

浪費機會

插隊前進

在惡霸的手中受苦

侵略你的領土

宣布截止日期

分享突發新聞

不尊重你的團體

餓了沒法子

說長道短

誤解你的話

沒有提供機會

誹謗你相信的事業

寂寞的過日子

走捷徑

當殘酷的受害者

殘酷他人

給點東西

挑選獲獎者

尋求幫助

哪一種對你來講是要緊的,有機會讓人去觸怒你,或是更可能推你去採取行動?

哪一種會讓你轉過頭來,引起你的注意,甚至打破你的節奏?

我們通常只注意到我們所關心的事情,也努力去忽視其餘對我們不重要的事。

您可以通過更改您所注意到的事,來更改您所關心的內容。

Learning to Become a Pro, Part 6

In the book, The War of Art, author Steven Pressfield talked about what separates amateurs from professionals and how a professional became who they are.

I will write about what these aspects mean to me personally.

The professional endures adversity

The pro knows the costs of being in the game. The field is never leveled, and bad lucks can rain down on him when least expected or needed. Despite all the things that can potentially go against the pro, he knows his core belief is always there and cannot be buried alive.

The professional self-validates

The pro takes control of his situation and does not allow the actions of others to define his reality. He does so by controlling his reactions and not taking the criticism personally. The pro knows that, no matter what others might say or do, he has his own work to do.

The professional recognizes her limitations

The pro knows he can never be a master of all things, rather, just one thing. He will need help in other areas, and he treats the pros in those areas with respect.

Learning to Become a Pro, Part 5

In the book, The War of Art, author Steven Pressfield talked about what separates amateurs from professionals and how a professional became who they are.

I will write about what these aspects mean to me personally.

The professional does not hesitate to ask for help

The pro believes in continuous learning, from anyone who can help to level up his game. Everyone wants the pro to be the know-it-all, and some amateurs pretend to be that all-knowing being. The pro, however, knows better and thinks of himself as a perpetual student.

The professional does not identify with his or her instrument

The pro does not get caught up on or identify with the instrument he uses to deliver his work, even when that instrument is himself. The pro cares deeply about doing work and delivering, not so much with what he needs to use.

The professional does not take failure or success personally

The pro is not emotionally attached to the outcome of his work. He does that, so the fear of rejection or other negative emotions cannot be used by the Resistance against us. The pro is invested in his work, and he self-validates objectively. The pro seeks to learn and grow by keeping an open mind about criticism, but he does not allow the Resistance to use the criticism against him.

Learning to Become a Pro, Part 4

In the book, The War of Art, author Steven Pressfield talked about what separates amateurs from professionals and how a professional became who they are.

I will write about what these aspects mean to me personally.

The professional is prepared

The pro strives to deliver a consistently excellent performance, day in and day out. He knows that if he is not prepared well, the Resistance will come at him from all different angles and tries to induce paralysis.

The professional does not show off

The pro’s work is unique with his own style, but he let others do the talking. His work will be so remarkable that other will choose to remark on it, so he does not have to.

The professional dedicates himself to mastering a technique

The pro knows there were many giants who came before him. Rarely someone will come up with an entirely revolutionary idea that is totally original, so he always considers himself a student of some grandmaster who came before. He also believes that mastery comes when he can refine his technique with a rich portfolio of skills.