Tag: escalation

擔心會往上階層提高

(從我的一個喜歡與尊敬的作家,賽斯 高汀

當在任何兩人以上的機構中,都會有機會需要解決問題。

當軟件失去作用,或者客戶卡在那個過程之中時,您可以將問題移交給第二,第三,或是一直往上層提高。

提高一件問題不僅給問題帶來了更多解決問題的專心,而且會在組織內傳播也吸引了更多的注意。更好的是,提高問題解決能使您不會容易的失去客戶。

可是要了解也是:在某些時候,一個機構開始訓練他們的員工去避免往上層的提高。 他們害怕工作人員會時常叫狼來了,或者員工開始厭倦了這類為客戶的投入與付出。

當這一切發生的時刻,那通常就表示你的機構開始放棄你的客戶的時刻。

要不然讓你的前線員工有能力能獨立的為客戶當場解決問題,或是鼓勵他們在需要時從上階層繼續尋求幫助。

Major Incident Handling Process Design – Part Two

This post is the part two (and concluding part) of a series where we discuss the Major Incident Handling process and how to put one together. Previously we discussed the elements and considerations that should go into the process design. In this post, I have elaborated some of those considerations further with a sample process flow and a corresponding process design.

Sample Major Incident Handling Process Flow

Sample Major Incident Handling Process Design

A major incident generally imposes higher impact and requires special attention to resolve it. To summarize, I think an effective Major Incident Handling process design should clearly define at least the following who-does-what-by-when-and-how elements:

  • What constitutes a major incident in your organization? What criteria do you use to quickly and effectively determine and declare a major incident?
  • Who is accountable for coordinating and controlling the activities during a major incident exercise? The Major Incident Manager role can be fulfilled by a person or by a team, and she needs the proper authority to direct the activities and the people who are involved.
  • How the resolution efforts will be coordinated and conducted? The exact details may vary from one organization to another, or even from one incident to another. The general approach should be worked out beforehand, and the Major Incident Manager should be trained to utilize the approach as consistently as possible.
  • What escalation or communication approach will be used during and after the Major Incident?
  • What metrics will be used to measure the effectiveness of the process? Keep them simple, easily understood and reasonably painless to collect the data.
  • What format of communication and reporting will be used for the major incident? Who will get what type of information? Try to keep the contents appropriate for the intended audience.

I hope the information presented so far has been helpful. Please feel free to suggest options or other approaches that have worked for your organization.

Links to other posts in the series

Major Incident Handling Process Design – Part One

In IT, incidents as a result of technology failure or human error can strike at any moment. Occasionally, we can have an incident that has a wide impact and poses serious risks to the business operations. Those major incidents need to be handled swiftly, so the IT service can be restored quickly with useful information captured that can be used for the root cause analysis afterward. If you have business critical services or applications under your management, having an organized approach to handling major incidents can save a lot of time and improve productivity. If you need to put a process together for your organization, here are some elements to take into consideration.

  1. Scope and Criteria: What characteristics would qualify an incident as being a “Major” Incident? This is very organization specific but generally there are two basic elements to consider, impact and urgency. Many organizations use the combination of those two elements to classify the priority level assigned to an incident, and that is a good starting point. Any incident that possesses a high degree of impact and high degree of urgency should probably be considered “major” and get the utmost attention. You may have other characteristics you want to define. For example, the outage of a particular application or for a particular line of business may trigger a “major” incident automatically. Since mobilizing the people and logistic necessary to handle a major incident is never a trivial exercise, clearly defined and agreed upon scope and criteria are mandatory.
  2. Roles and Responsibilities: Who will declare a major incident is in motion and own the process execution end-to-end? Since we are talking about major incidents, the Incident Management process owner in your organization will likely own this process as well. Will you have a person or a team designated as the “Major Incident Manager?” Will you rotate such role from individual to individual or from team to team? Depending on the nature of the technology failure or breakdown, how will the major incident manager find the appropriate technical resources to get involved? Will the major incident manager someone who is on stand-by waiting for the occasions to spring into action or will she have another “day-job” and wear the major incident manager hat when necessary? This will again depend on how your organization feels about this role. One thing I am certain of is that this role will require someone with the appropriate skills, environment know-how, and leadership experience to pull people together and execute the agreed-upon process. Another word, I do not believe this is a simple service desk phone dispatch type of role.
  3. Logistic and Facility: Everyone needs to know exactly what to do when the major incident process gets initiated. Will you have a dedicated meeting space or war room type of set up? Will people know what teleconference number to use in order to call in and to provide updates or to receive updates? Will you have a separate teleconference number to work through the technology aspect of incident recovery without cluttering with other non-technical discussions? Who will manage the conference call? What criteria determine when the conference calls start and end? In addition to the conference call, will you hold some kind of web meeting or online collaboration setup where people can share things on screen? Will you have some type of continual update via web or email, so people can stay informed? All these finer details should be planned upfront.
  4. Escalation and Communication: How will you define the communication interval and who will receive what communication at what point in time? How will the incident be escalated up the chain of command as long as the incident remains open? For example, you may define something simple as follow:
    1. At Hour 0: Major incident declared and the technical team contacted by phone. Director of the technical team and VP of IT notified via email.
    2. At Minute 30: Director of the technical team notified again via email with updates.
    3. At Hour 1: Major Incident Manager asks the Director of the technical team to join the conference in person. Another email update goes to the VP of IT.
    4. At Hour 2: Major Incident Manager asks the VP of IT asked to join the conference call for updates.
    5. At Hour 4: Major Incident Manager asks the business customer to join the conference call for updates and to discuss other recovery options.
  5. Other Considerations: How will this process connect with a downstream process such as Problem Management? Will you have the problem manager on the call as the incident progresses? What documentation or deliverables will the major incident process produce? Simple log of incident chronology, who participated the call when, important details shared at various point of the incident, official updates communicated, reasons for the incident closure, and other pertinent information about the incident probably should be documented at a minimum.

One thing for sure, all these considerations are too important not to get agreed upon beforehand. When the agreed upon details are not in place, it is simply not productive for everyone involved to try to figure out the process details during the heat of the battle. When that happens, most people have a tendency to go into the “headless chicken” mode – responsibility-dodging and finger-pointing start to spawn shortly afterward. In the next post, I will provide a sample process flow for further discussion.

Links to other posts in the series