Tag: Jeff Goins

Jeff Goins on Real Artists Don’t Starve, Part 7

In his book, Real Artists Don’t Starve: Timeless Strategies for Thriving in the New Creative Age, Jeff Goins discusses how we can apply prudent strategies in positioning ourselves for thriving in our chosen field of craft.

These are some of my favorite concepts and takeaways from reading the book.

Chapter 7, Collaborate with Others

In this chapter, Jeff discusses the importance of collaborating with others for thriving artists. He offers the following recommendations for us to think about:

  • While some successful geniuses chose to work alone, many did their best work when collaborating with others. The new definition of an artist is a visionary who brings people and resources together to create opportunities for our work to flourish. Thus, our success is closely related to our ability to work well with others.
  • Creative output is often a slow and grueling endeavor and, at times, can feel discouraging. However, during those painful moments, we need people to correct our path. Furthermore, creativity works best when it originates from a small community circle instead of a solitary invention.
  • Sometimes we need more than just a loose collective of peers to help us succeed. For those occasions, we might need a more formal group of coworkers or business partners to help us realize our vision. Hire professional help, coordinate, and integrate their work with ours is the job of an artist.
  • If we want to do world-changing creative work, we might need to accept the reality that we likely will not be able to do it alone. So it is the thriving artist’s job to cultivate the circles of collaboration and create a sense of accountability that could drive everyone in the circle to create better work.

In summary, “The Starving Artist always works alone. The Thriving Artist collaborates with others.”

Jeff Goins on Real Artists Don’t Starve, Part 6

In his book, Real Artists Don’t Starve: Timeless Strategies for Thriving in the New Creative Age, Jeff Goins discusses how we can apply prudent strategies in positioning ourselves for thriving in our chosen field of craft.

These are some of my favorite concepts and takeaways from reading the book.

Chapter 6, Go Join a Scene

In this chapter, Jeff discusses the importance of where we do our work and its effect on our work. He offers the following recommendations for us to think about:

  • Our environment can affect how others perceive our work. One way it does that is by affecting the network we can build in that environment. Different settings allow us to create various networks. Those networks can contribute both positively and negatively to our work.
  • As an artist, we must be good at what we do, but being good is not enough. We must also have access to influential people who can help us spread our work and ideas. A network is our insurance against anonymity.
  • An artist will inevitably ensure many rejections. There will be many people who would reject our work for a variety of reasons. When we get rejected repeatedly, sometimes the best approach is not to work harder but to change the location or the scenery.
  • Not everyone can move to another location on a whim. Sometimes we need to stay where we are. Therefore, it is essential to create a scene or environment conducive to doing our work. There are tools for creating meet-ups and opportunities for like-minded individuals to connect locally. Sometimes the community we need could be right in front of us.
  • Success in any creative field is contingent on the scenes and the networks we are part of. First, we can build a network by contributing more than we take from it. Then, as we make those contributions over time, we will create a group of relationships, or networks, that we can take with us wherever we go.

In summary, “The Starving Artist believes he can be creative anywhere. The Thriving Artist goes where creative work is already happening.”

Jeff Goins on Real Artists Don’t Starve, Part 5

In his book, Real Artists Don’t Starve: Timeless Strategies for Thriving in the New Creative Age, Jeff Goins discusses how we can apply prudent strategies in positioning ourselves for thriving in our chosen field of craft.

These are some of my favorite concepts and takeaways from reading the book.

Chapter 5, Cultivate Patrons

In this chapter, Jeff discusses the importance of cultivating patrons who can support our work and succeed with us. He offers the following recommendations for us to think about:

  • In creative work, quality is subjective. Subjectivity means that not only we must practice, but also we need patrons for our work. A patron is an advocate who sees our potential and believes in our work. Support from a patron needs not to be just financial. It could be someone who gives us a chance or maybe connects us to the right contacts.
  • Patrons might not be wealthy connoisseurs or influential leaders. They are people who are willing to help to see our work succeed. It is also our job to recognize them and prove themselves worthy of their investment.
  • To attract patrons, we need to be teachable. Being teachable is to demonstrate both competency in our craft and a willingness to learn. In addition, influencers want to help and invest in others, so being teachable will make it easy for them to support our work.
  • Creative work is a team sport –success often comes in the form of artist and patron partnership. Unfortunately, while much of the focus has been on artists finding their patrons, it is easy to miss that patrons also need artists they can believe in and trust.
  • One way to find patrons is to find those people who are already investing in others and reach out to them. If we work hard on our craft and share our competencies, we can find those who can help our work spread. Instead of waiting to be noticed, we look for opportunities to allow ourselves to be taught and molded by those who show genuine interest in our work.

In summary, “The Starving Artist waits to be noticed. The Thriving Artist cultivates patrons.”

Jeff Goins on Real Artists Don’t Starve, Part 4

In his book, Real Artists Don’t Starve: Timeless Strategies for Thriving in the New Creative Age, Jeff Goins discusses how we can apply prudent strategies in positioning ourselves for thriving in our chosen field of craft.

These are some of my favorite concepts and takeaways from reading the book.

Chapter 4, Harness Your Stubbornness

In this chapter, Jeff discusses why it is essential for thriving artists to harness their stubbornness. He offers the following recommendations for us to think about:

  • All artists have a secret weapon, and it is stubbornness. It is not productive to be stubborn about everything. We need to channel the stubbornness energy strategically on things that count.
  • Strategic stubbornness is the ability to persevere and maintain passion for long-term goals despite adverse circumstances. Grit, as defined by Angela Duckworth, entails working strenuously toward challenges and maintaining effort and interest over time despite failure, adversity, and plateaus in progress.
  • As aspiring artists, our job is not to be perfect every time but to be creating. By consistently creating and delivering projects, we can harness our stubbornness and apply it toward the right things. We need to turn our determination into tenacity and leverage it to succeed.
  • Strategic stubbornness for thriving artists focuses on the vision, but we are flexible on the supporting details to get to the end goal. Along the way, there will be plenty of support and criticism, but the thriving artists do not take any of it personally. We realize the ultimate success might not be totally up to us, so the best we can do is keep on creating and delivering.
  • For most successful work or endeavors, talent did not cause them; tenacity did. If we want our work to succeed, we need to be stubborn about the right thing. In creative work, stubbornness can be an asset.

In summary, “The Starving Artist is stubborn about everything. The Thriving Artist is stubborn about the right things.”

Jeff Goins on Real Artists Don’t Starve, Part 3

In his book, Real Artists Don’t Starve: Timeless Strategies for Thriving in the New Creative Age, Jeff Goins discusses how we can apply prudent strategies in positioning ourselves for thriving in our chosen field of craft.

These are some of my favorite concepts and takeaways from reading the book.

Chapter 3, Apprentice Under a Master

In this chapter, Jeff discusses the importance of seeking out apprentice opportunities on our journey to master the craft. He offers the following recommendations for us to think about:

  • Becoming a master means we will master our craft. However, before we become masters, we must first become apprentices.
  • An apprentice makes a conscious choice to do whatever it takes to master the craft. The marks of a good apprentice are patience, perseverance, and humility.
  • An apprentice does not give up, and they also do what no one else is willing to do to acquire mastery. Therefore, we must be diligent enough to take the work seriously and continue to grow.
  • The first step in an apprenticeship is to find a master who is worth studying. When we find such a person, our goal is to consume as much of their work as possible and familiarize ourselves with it.
  • When the apprenticeship starts, we consistently do the hard work and keep showing up, regardless of the outcome. But, in the end, hard work is all we can measure.
  • As thriving artists, we are both humble enough to admit our need for help and sufficiently audacious to see it out. Great work is a result of a willingness to become an apprentice on our journey to mastery.

In summary, “The Starving Artist believes he has enough talent. The Thriving Artist apprentices under a master.”